Loop Shares “Resilience Is About How You Recharge, Not How You Endure”

Loop Shares “Resilience Is About How You Recharge, Not How You Endure”

Loop Shares “Resilience Is About How You Recharge, Not How You Endure”

“Our society builds our mentality with unrealistic and unhealthy ways to become resilient. We allow ourselves to go beyond our health and dangerous ways to reach our goals. While pushing yourself is great and helps you accomplish numerous goals. It’s when it becomes obsessive that resilience should find another way of accomplishing tasks,” says Loop. According to the Harvard Business Review “Resilience Is About How You Recharge, Not How You Endure” by Shawn Achor and Michelle Gielan. The writers mention that a lack of recovery not only slows you down, but it actually has a negative effect on how you are resilient.

 

Achor and Gielan write “The very lack of a recovery period is dramatically holding back our collective ability to be resilient and successful. Research has found that there is a direct correlation between lack of recovery and increased incidence of health and safety problems. And lack of recovery — whether by disrupting sleep with thoughts of work or having continuous cognitive arousal by watching our phones — is costing our companies $62 billion a year (that’s billion, not million) in lost productivity.” “One of the best ways to combat this situation is by doing your best to be healthy. To be active in maintaining your mind and physical form by not becoming obsessive, give yourself the opportunity to recharge so you can function better each day,” says Loop.

 

The article by Achor and Gielan also states, “The misconception of resilience is often bred from an early age. Parents trying to teach their children resilience might celebrate a high school student staying up until 3AM to finish a science fair project. What a distortion of resilience! A resilient child is a well-rested one. When an exhausted student goes to school, he risks hurting everyone on the road with his impaired driving; he doesn’t have the cognitive resources to do well on his English test; he has lower self-control with his friends; and at home, he is moody with his parents. Overwork and exhaustion are the opposite of resilience. And the bad habits we learn when we’re young only magnify when we hit the workforce. The key to resilience is trying really hard, then stopping, recovering, and then trying again. This conclusion is based on biology. Homeostasis is a fundamental biological concept describing the ability of the brain to continuously restore and sustain well-being. Positive neuroscientist Brent Furl from Texas A&M University coined the term “homeostatic value” to describe the value that certain actions have for creating equilibrium, and thus wellbeing, in the body. When the body is out of alignment from overworking, we waste a vast amount of mental and physical resources trying to return to balance before we can move forward.”

 

“This is the best way to stabilize your ability to be resilient. Many people confused and associate resilience with overworking and tiring yourself out to the point of exhaustion, but continuing anyway. The best way to accomplish what you need is to be resilient, take well-strategized breaks and get back to being resilient again,” says Loop.

 

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